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A Prescription for Anxiety

Article copyright by Bob Rogers.

Doctors regularly write prescriptions for all kinds of ailments. We have medicines to relieve pain, relieve high blood pressure, reduce fluids in the body, fight infection, and even to calm our nerves. These are good and useful to our physical health.

Anxiety is often a symptom of those who are sick. Good news–there is also a spiritual medicine available for that! If you are feeling anxious, fearful, and frequently worried, then I encourage you to consider the prescription found in Philippians 4:4-9.

To take this prescription, you will need a Bible and paper or a device to take notes. Read the following verses and then take the doses below:

 Philippians 4:6: “Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God.” Determine to name your worries and fears. Write them out. Go to Matthew 6:25-34 and take note of the worries that Christ names and dispels in that passage. Then, do as Philippians 4:6 says, and instead of worrying about the problem, present your problem to God in prayer. Instead of telling God how big your problem is, tell your problem how big your God is.

 Philippians 4:7: “And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.” As you pray, ask yourself, against what does your heart need to be guarded? Is it fear? Against what does your mind need a guarded? Is it doubt? Is it something else? Ask Christ to stand guard over your heart and mind.

 Philippians 4:8: “Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy-meditate on these things.” Divide your page into two parts. On the left, list each of the good things in this verse. On the right, list a specific example of how you have seen and experienced this in your life. Then, do as the verse says and meditate on “these things.” Go back and read Philippians 4:4, which urges us to rejoice. Spend a few moments rejoicing over the good things you listed.

 Philippians 4:9: “The things which you learned and received and heard and saw in me, these do, and the God of peace will be with you.” Now it is time for action. In this verse, Paul urges the Philippians to do what they saw in him. Likewise, you can think of a hero of the faith, and what you have learned from him or her. Now is time for an action plan! Just as Paul urged them to do, write down what you will do. Put a specific time and date on it. Notice the verse ends with a promise, “and the God of peace will be with you.”

Praying and reading Scripture is good medicine-you can’t take too much! In fact, you may want to take the above medicine in different doses every day. You could take each of the above verses and actions one day at a time. Then, you may want to read the entire fourth chapter of Philippians each day for a week, making notes on the assurances and encouraging words.

A generation ago, people joked that a doctor would tell a patient, “Take two aspirin and call me in the morning.” Let me encourage you to take whatever your medical doctor prescribes, but also take these doses of Philippians, then comment to me in the morning! I would like to hear from you–so leave a comment below. Feel free to send us other scripture that you have found helpful. May the Lord bless you as you meditate on His word.

How to Overcome Worry

WorryWoman

Article copyright by Bob Rogers.
There are more things to worry about than sand on the seashore. But in the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus said, “Don’t worry about your life… or about your body” (Matthew 6:25, CSB). Jesus followed that statement with five reasons why we don’t need to worry. In each of these reasons is a truth that teaches us how to replace worry with something else!
1. Life is about more than things (6:25). Jesus said, “Don’t worry… Isn’t life more than food and the body more than clothing?” This question teaches us to overcome worry by changing our priorities in life. Once Jesus turned down lunch from his disciples and said, “I have food to eat that you don’t know about” (John 4:32). He was referring to the satisfaction in His soul of leading the Samaritan woman at the well to faith. Jesus didn’t worry about things, because His priority was spiritual.
2. Since God provides for His creation, you can trust that He will provide for you (6:26). “Consider the birds of the sky,” said Jesus. “They don’t sow or reap or gather into barns, yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Aren’t you worth more than they?” This truth teaches us to replace worry with faith. Instead of turning over negative things in your mind, meditate on positive gifts from God. “Don’t worry about anything; instead, pray about everything” (Philippians 4:6, NLT).
3. Worry doesn’t change your problem (6:27). Jesus asked, “Can any of you add one moment to his life span by worrying?” This truth teaches us that worry is a waste of time—time that could be spent doing something useful, such as taking action to deal with the problem. My friend Melisa Grubbs says, “I can be a worrier or a warrior.”
4. If you focus on God instead of your problem, God will provide (6:33). When you hold a small object close to your face, it looks bigger than any object in the room. Worry is like holding your problem close to your face, instead of looking to God. Jesus promised, “But seek first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness, and all these things will be provided for you.” He was teaching us to replace worry by looking closely at God instead of looking closely at the problem. Scripture and prayer help us focus on God. Some helpful verses are: Psalm 27:1, Psalm 34:4, Isaiah 26:3, Matthew 11:28-30, Philippians 4:7, and 1 Peter 5:7.
5. Learn to live in the present (6:34). Jesus said, “Don’t worry about tomorrow, because tomorrow will worry about itself.” How often have you fretted in anticipation of something out of your control, and later learned it was not an issue after all? So, replace worry about tomorrow by living in the present. Don’t miss the beauty of today by imagining things that may not even happen tomorrow.
No wonder Jesus Himself could sleep through a storm, and then wake up and calm the sea (Mark 4:38-40). Rest in the Savior, and He can calm your storm, as well. “Give all your worries and cares to God, for he cares about you” (1 Peter 5:7, NLT).

Surprised by Joy

Copyright 2014 by Bob Rogers

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Christian writer C.S. Lewis famously described his salvation experience as being “surprised by joy.” Joy is one of the fruit of the Holy Spirit listed in Galatians 5:22– and it is surprising how joy comes. Notice these three examples from the Bible:

*Joyful surprise of forgiveness from sin. When we are convicted of sin, we usually feel shame and may even experience depression. Yet confession of sin and God’s forgiveness brings the surprising result of joy. After David’s confession of the sin of adultery with Bathsheba, he cried out to God in Psalm 51:12, “Restore the joy of Your salvation to me.” God answered that prayer, for in Psalm 32 he exclaims, “How joyful is the one whose transgression is forgiven… How joyful is the man the LORD does not charge with sin…” (Psalm 32:1-2, HCSB).

*Joyful surprise during trials. When we suffer trials, we may experience stress, anxiety and worry. Yet James says that God uses trials to produce a godly endurance and maturity, which once again is a surprising reason for  joy. “Dear brothers and sisters, when troubles come your way, consider it an opportunity for great joy. For you know that when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow” (James 1:2-3, NLT).

*Joyful surprise of strength in the midst of grief. How can we experience joy in the midst of grief? Isn’t grief the opposite of joy? After the Jews returned to Jerusalem from exile, Ezra the scribe gathered all the people in the public square and read the law of Moses to the people and explained it to them. The people began to weep, grieved over their ignorant disobedience of God’s word. But the priests urged them to celebrate instead of weep. Why? They said, “Do not be grieved, for the joy of the LORD is your strength” (Nehemiah 8:10, NASB). It is natural to grieve when we experience loss in our lives, but when we take a look in faith at the big picture, we draw strength from the LORD, who is our Savior. As the apostle Paul says in Romans 8:18, “For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is going to be revealed to us.”

So my brothers and sisters, has life got you down? Are you ashamed and grieving over your past, and anxious and hurting in the present? Then look in faith to the wonderful future you have in Christ. Surprise! The joy of the Lord is your strength.

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